Archived - The British Columbia Francophone Community

This page has been archived on the Web.

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

Introduction

This document presents the results of research conducted in the winter of 2009 in the British Columbia Francophone community. Conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, this research is the third phase of a multi-year action-research project aimed at better understanding the practical aspects of assessing community vitality. The first phase was carried out in 2006 with three Francophone communities in urban settings, and the second in 2007 with three English-speaking communities in Quebec.

This report consists of four sections. Section 1 describes the context of the study and the methodology used. Section 2 sets out a brief profile of the British Columbia Francophone community. Section 3 gives an overview of the various best practices in the community. Section 4 presents logic models and indicators produced and validated by the task force and retained by the research team. It also provides data sources that can be used to verify these indicators. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusion of the report. Following the conclusion are a list of documents consulted (Appendix A) and a list of task force members (Appendix B).

1. Methodology

In carrying out the mandate provided by the Office of the Commissioner, the research team followed a step-by-step methodology similar to that used in previous phases. This methodology was designed to ensure optimal participation of the communities selected, in an effort to focus on the opinions and aspirations of the communities concerned while helping to strengthen their capacities for planning and for evaluating community vitality. The methodology has also been refined based on lessons learned in the previous two phases.

In cooperation with the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique, leaders of the British Columbia Francophone community (the steering committee) were first selected and consulted to support the consultants' work and to establish the general directions of the study. The steering committee determined the community to be studied, priority sectors and other research criteria. In order to be representative of the various Francophone communities throughout the province, the steering committee agreed that the study would focus on the British Columbia Francophone community as a whole and that the priority sectors would be the following: 1) governance, 2) immigration and migration, 3) participation, and 4) belonging (participation and belonging being two aspects of community renewal).

With the help of the steering committee, a task force was set up, consisting of community leaders and key stakeholders from several regions and priority sectors within the province. This 25-person group held an initial meeting on January 9, 2009, during which it established the community's expectations for the four priority sectors. These results were used to create four logic models. During its second meeting on March 9, 2009, the task force reviewed and validated the logic models. It then chose appropriate indicators to measure the degree of achievement of anticipated results and discussed data sources that could be used in this community evaluation. The group also presented best practices recognized by the community.

This report was developed based on this work and on the collection and analysis of other pertinent documents and information on the British Columbia Francophone community.

2. Profile of the British Columbia Francophonie

2.1. Population

2.1.1. HistoryFootnote 1

The Francophone presence in British Columbia is nothing new. In fact, when Alexander Mackenzie crossed the Rockies in 1783, he was accompanied by six French Canadians. In 1805, Simon Fraser and some 20 Francophones started leading expeditions and the construction of a series of forts on behalf of the North West Company. In the 19th century, the fur trade was also a gateway to colonization of the region by a majority of Francophones, until the time of the gold rush and the massive influx of newcomers. In 1909, some families from Quebec working in the lumber industries on the shores of the Fraser River created a Francophone community and parish that would become Maillardville in 1912.

Over time, the number of cultural and social organizations grew. In 1905, the Union Canadienne-Française de Vancouver was formed. In 1945, the first provincial association, the Fédération Canadienne-Française de la Colombie-Britannique, was created to represent the aspirations and interests of its members. The Fédération did so primarily by seeking to secure educational rights, which led to the launch of a French immersion program in 1969, the Core French program in 1978, the creation of the Conseil scolaire francophone in 1995 and the amendment of the School Act in 1997. The Federation itself successively adopted the names Fédération des Franco-Colombiens and then Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique (FFCB), and broadened its mandate, representation and collaboration with provincial, regional and local organizations in various spheres of the Francophone community.

2.1.2. Demographics

According to the results of the last two censes by Statistics Canada, the population in British Columbia with FrenchFootnote 2 as first official language spokenFootnote 3 was, in 2006, 53,060, or 1.3% of British Columbia's population,Footnote 4 compared to 51,970 people (1.34% of the population) in 2001.Footnote 5

The vast majority of the population with French as a first official language spoken (85.3%) lives in urban areas, including metropolitan Vancouver, the provincial capital of Victoria and 24 urban areas, while the other 14.7% live in rural areas.Footnote 6 Of the Francophones residing in rural areas, about half, or 7.7% of the total Francophone population, live outside the boundaries of metropolitan and urban areas.Footnote 7

2.1.3. Knowledge and use of French

Examining the population according to different linguistic variables provides insight on the composition of the Francophone community, its linguistic vitality and its language use in both private and public spaces.

According to the 2006 Census,Footnote 8 15,320 people in British Columbia reported French as the language spoken most often at home, 3,610 reported both English and French, and 1,040 reported French and another non-official language, or even English, French and a non-official language.

Within British Columbia's overall population, the number of people who reported knowledge of the two official languages was 295,645, or 7.25%.Footnote 9 In the Vancouver Census metropolitan area, the number of people with a knowledge of French and English was 162,790,Footnote 10 or 7.8% of the metropolitan population. In 2006, the percentage of British Columbia Anglophones who were bilingual in French and English was 6.6%, an increase of 0.6% compared to 2001, while this figure was 4.5% for allophones, an increase of 0.1% compared to 2001.Footnote 11 The vast majority of British Columbia Francophones speak both official languages.

2.1.4. Age

In 2006, adults aged 20 to 44 (34.5%) and 45 to 64 (37.7%) accounted for the majority of British Columbia Francophones with French as their first official language.Footnote 12 Youth under the age of 20 make up 9.1% of the Francophone population, which is only half the number of seniors 65 and over, who accounted for 18.7%.Footnote 13 This suggests both decreasing birth rates and aging of Francophone population.

2.1.5. Origins

In British Columbia, among Francophones with French as their first official language, 82.8% were born in Canada.Footnote 14 Within this group, 88.3% were born outside the province.

Net interprovincial migration of Francophones to British Columbia has decreased considerably. The number of Francophones moving to British Columbia from other Canadian provinces fell from 6,210 between 1991 and 1996 to 990 between 1996 and 2001, and to 495 between 2001 and 2006.Footnote 15 If this trend continues, the British Columbia Francophone community will no longer be able to count on interprovincial migration for population growth.

2.1.6. Socio-economic conditions

The level of education is slightly higher for Francophones than for Anglophones. Compared to Anglophones, a lower proportion of Francophones has no certificate or diploma and a higher proportion has a university degree.

In 2006, British Columbia Francophones aged 15 and older with French as their first official language had an overall income (average and median) and employment income (average and median) slightly higher than those of the British Columbia population with English as their first official language.Footnote 16 This is due in part to the fact that a higher proportion of them are in the labour market and are post-secondary graduates.Footnote 17

2.2. Organizational capacity

The British Columbia Francophone population has established many (not-for-profit) community associations and institutions that are listed in the directory Annuaire, la Colombie-Britannique à votre service en français.Footnote 18

Organizations with provincial and sectoral mandates are found mainly in Vancouver, and there are also several organizations with local and regional mandates in Metropolitan Vancouver. Moreover, Francophone communities in other regions are more inclined to support local community organizations offering limited services and activity programs, schools, as well as some service offices of provincial organizations or institutions. The organizations and entities listed below are taken from the Annuaire, la Colombie-Britannique à votre service en français as well as from other supplementary sources with regard to schools.

Provincial and sectoral associations

  • Amicale des anciens combattants français de Colombie-Britannique
  • Association des juristes d'expression française de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Association Provinciale des Professeurs d'Immersion et du Programme Francophone
  • British Columbia Francophone Scouts
  • Canadian Parents for French (B.C. and Yukon)
  • Conseil culturel et artistique francophone de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Conseil jeunesse francophone de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Conseil scolaire francophone de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Educacentre College
  • Fédération des enseignantes et enseignants de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-BritanniqueFootnote 19
  • Fédération des parents francophones de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Fondation André-Piolat
  • Fondation canadienne-française d'aide culturelle de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Fondation des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Réseau-Femmes Colombie-Britannique
  • RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique
  • Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Société Inform'Elles
  • Syndicat des enseignantes et enseignants du programme francophone de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Visions Ouest Productions

Regional associations

  • Association des francophones de Kamloops
  • Association des francophones de Nanaimo
  • Association des francophones et francophiles du Nord-Ouest
  • Association francophone de Campbell River
  • Association francophone de la vallée de Comox
  • Association francophone de Surrey
  • Association francophone des Kootenays Ouest
  • Centre culturel français de l'Okanagan
  • Centre culturel francophone de Vancouver
  • Club Bon Accueil (Powell River)
  • Le Cercle des Canadiens-français de Prince George
  • Société francophone de Maillardville
  • Société francophone de Victoria

Community associations, French schools and service agencies by area

Metropolitan Vancouver
  • Agence francophone pour l'accueil des immigrants
  • Alliance Française de Vancouver
  • Association francophone de Richmond
  • Centre Bel Âge
  • Centre of Integration for African Immigrants
  • Chambre de commerce Franco-Colombienne de Vancouver
  • École André-Piolat (North Vancouver)
  • École Anne-Hébert (Vancouver)
  • École des Deux-Rives (Mission)
  • École des Navigateurs (Richmond)
  • École des Pionniers de Maillardville
  • École des Voyageurs (Langley)
  • École du Bois-Joli (Delta)
  • École Française Internationale de Vancouver
  • École Gabrielle-Roy (Surrey)
  • École Jules-Verne (Vancouver)
  • École La Vérendrye (Chilliwack)
  • École Rose-des-Vents (Vancouver)
  • Educacentre College, Vancouver campus
  • Festival du Bois (Maillardville)
  • Foyer Maillard (Maillardville)
  • Garderie l'île aux enfants (Vancouver)
  • L'Express du Pacifique
  • La Boussole
  • La Coccinelle (preschool and daycare) (Surrey)
  • La Source (bilingual newspaper)
  • Les Échos du Pacifique (choir)
  • Les Moussaillons et Les Matelots (preschool and daycare) (Richmond)
  • Maison de la francophonie de Vancouver
  • Office of Francophone and Francophile Affairs, Simon Fraser University
  • Pomme d'Api Preschool (Vancouver)
  • Prématernelle Trottin-Trottinette (North Vancouver)
  • Saint-Raphaël Parish
  • Saint-Sacrement Parish
  • Théâtre la Seizième
Victoria area
  • Association historique francophone de Victoria
  • Centre d'accueil et de services à l'emploi (Société francophone de Victoria)
  • École Victor-Brodeur (Victoria)
  • Educacentre College, Victoria campus
  • Garderie et Prématernelle Saute-Mouton
  • Military Family Resource Centre (CFB Esquimalt)
  • Saint-Jean-Baptiste Parish
  • Société radio communautaire Victoria
  • Traditional dance troupe "Les Cornouillers"
Other Vancouver Island communities
  • École Au coeur de l'île (Comox valley)
  • École Des Grands Cèdres (Port Alberni)
  • École Mer et montagne (Campbell River)
  • École Océane (Nanaimo)
  • Educacentre College, Nanaimo campus
  • Military Family Resource Centre (CFB Comox)
Sunshine Coast and Howe Sound
  • École Côte du Soleil (Powell River)
  • École de la Vallée de Pemberton
  • École du Pacifique (Sechelt)
  • École La Passerelle (Whistler)
  • École Les Aiglons (Squamish)
Southeast area
  • Centre francophone de services à l'emploi de l'Okanagan
  • École Collines d'or (Kamloops)
  • École de l'Anse-au-Sable (Kelowna)
  • École des Sentiers-Alpins (Nelson)
  • École des Septs-Sommets (Rossland)
  • École Entre Lacs (Penticton)

3. Best practices

This section describes what are viewed as best practices in the British Columbia Francophone community. These practices were identified during discussions between the task force participants and then between the participants and the research team. These practices are related to the community development model, to welcoming newcomers and Francophiles, to partnerships between Francophone organizations and institutions, and partnerships with British Columbia authorities, organizations and institutions, as well as to Francophone culture and gatherings.

3.1. Development model

The 2009-2014 Global Development Plan of the British Columbia Francophone community, which is its fourth five-year plan, is based on consultations with members and was approved by these members at a general assembly. The British Columbia Francophone community has adopted a decentralized governance structure composed of independent organizations. This is a development model based on strong and well-rooted local associations.

3.2. Immigration and migration

In British Columbia, the Francophone community has acquired significant experience with cultural diversity. The common thread and rallying point is a focus on the French language.

The Agence francophone pour l'accueil des immigrants (AFAI), is a model welcome and orientation centre for the newcomers within the province. It was created by a consortium of Francophone institutions and organizations: La Boussole, the Société Inform'Elles, the Educacentre College, the Conseil scolaire francophone de la Colombie-Britannique, the Conseil jeunesse francophone de la Colombie-Britannique and the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique. This consortium is funded by the provincial government under the Canada–British Columbia Co-operation Agreement on Official Languages. Some of the services offered by the AFAI include welcoming newcomers, the introduction and integration of newcomers into the province's Francophone community and an orientation on relevant French-language services.Footnote 20

A successful example of community partnership in the immigration sector was the bilingual citizenship ceremony held in 2009 at the École Gabrielle-Roy in Surrey. This ceremony was made possible thanks to a partnership between the Conseil scolaire francophone, the Association francophone de Surrey, Citizenship and Immigration Canada and the AFAI. The AFAI and other partners plan to organize an annual bilingual citizenship ceremony for Francophones.

3.3. Francophone-Francophile collaboration

Sponsored by Canadian Parents for French (CPF) and financially supported by the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Conseil scolaire francophone, the Bilingualism Rocks project is a tangible example of Francophone-Francophile collaboration. In the context of this project, three music groups toured over 25 communities in British Columbia and the Yukon in 2008–2009. Bilingualism Rocks targeted students from grades 1–7 and aimed to create connections between Francophone and Francophile youth while increasing their appreciation of French language and culture.Footnote 21

In order to implement this project, CPF negotiated with three Francophone community organizations in the area to make sure the project did not interfere with school cultural programs. This approach enabled the organization to envision, for the future, a more structured collaboration with these programs to reinforce the province's Francophone cultural infrastructure.

3.4. Partnerships

The practices promoted by Francophone associations—through internal collaboration and partnerships with provincial and local authorities, including British Columbia municipalities, organizations and institutions—are seen as processes having a positive impact on the Francophone community. Here are some examples:

3.4.1. RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique

RésoSanté Colombie-BritanniqueFootnote 22 is based on a mobilization of partners, which in turn relies on community support and a provincial network inspired by the World Health Organization's pentagonal partnership model (which has five components: health professionals, health organization managers, community organizations, health training institutions and the provincial and federal governments). RésoSanté promotes and supports the development of, access to and continuity of health services available in French in British Columbia.Footnote 23

The health promotion initiative on Vancouver Island is a good example of this approach. Under this initiative, RésoSanté benefited from financial support received at the national level (Société Santé en français, Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada) and the presence of Francophone community infrastructures to implement consultations and meetings based on dialogue and collaboration, and focused on action. These consultations and collaborations allowed the various participants to share knowledge on research and regional needs.

As this approach must take current policies, priorities and capacities into account, it allowed the communication and development of health services in French to be harmonized within the framework of an existing system. It also promoted integrated access, support and continuity of health services that better meet the needs of the Vancouver Island Francophone population.

3.4.2. Simon Fraser University

The Office of Francophone and Francophile Affairs (OFFA) states that its "mission is to develop, to coordinate and to promote post-secondary programs and courses taught in French at Simon Fraser University in order to meet the post-secondary education needs of Francophone and Francophile communities in British Columbia."Footnote 24 The OFFA also promotes French through various cultural activities and vigorously stresses the importance of cooperation with both the Francophone and Francophile communities. It believes that, without this cooperation, the quality of programs offered in French would not be the same. For instance:

  • In the Program in Public Administration and Community Services, projects and research work undertaken by the students of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, under the guidance of their professors, are carried out in collaboration with local Francophone organizations. The results of their research are then presented not only to other students but also to representatives of the organizations and members of the Francophone community.
  • At the Faculty of Education, as part of their training, all future teachers are called upon to volunteer in Francophone organizations and associations. The goal is, on the one hand, to raise students' awareness of the principle of community service and, on the other, to familiarize them with the wealth of resources offered by the local Francophone community.

3.4.3. Conseil scolaire francophone de la Colombie-Britannique

Since its creation in 1995, the Conseil scolaire francophone de la Colombie-Britannique (CSF) has had many success stories.

Since 2001, the CSF has experienced the highest growth rate in the province, with an over 50% increase in enrolments in its schools. The school board expected to welcome over 4,300 students to its 38 schools in September 2009.

In 2005, the CSF adopted a decentralized approach aimed at increasing accountability and encouraging the school community to more actively participate in decision-making processes that directly impact the measures taken to meet the needs of students and their schools. With this approach, the CSF also wanted to promote the development of sustainable relationships with its partners, by further involving them in community, school and CSF life.

Recently, the British Columbia Ministry of Education granted the CSF the necessary funding to build new schools in the Francophone communities of Comox and Campbell River. The construction should be completed in the next two years and will create new learning facilities that are stimulating, modern and adapted to the needs of Francophones in the northern part of Vancouver Island.

During the 2009–2010 school year, the Francophone schools of Surrey, Vancouver, Port Coquitlam and Victoria will offer the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program to students aged 16 to 19.Footnote 25

It should also be noted that the 2008–2009 annual report of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages highlighted the commitment and leadership of Marie Bourgeois, Chair of the Conseil scolaire francophone, with regard to the Francophone community.

3.4.4. Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique

The Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique (SDECB)Footnote 26 is a provincial Francophone organization that represents the interests of the economic sector of the British Columbia Francophone community.

In 2008–2009, the SDECB intensified its activities to create new partnerships between the Francophone community, Francophiles and the general British Columbia population. These efforts were recognized through the Baldwin-Lafontaine Award presented by the Canadian Club of Vancouver.

Furthermore, Western Economic Diversification Canada publicly recognized the SDECB before the Western Canada Business Service Network for its important contribution to the economic development of the province's Francophone community.

In order to demonstrate its contribution to the development and vitality of the Francophone community, the SDECB led the "branding" project. This project, funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage, aims to develop a new community image and to communicate the presence and active participation of Francophones in the British Columbia community, particularly in light of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

The SDECB is also very active in the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program, led by the provincial Ministry of Economic Development in partnership with Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

In the tourism sector, the SDECB is home to a major project entitled the Pan-Western Francophone Tourism Corridor, an initiative funded by the Department of Western Economic Diversification that creates ties between Western Canada's Francophone communities in order to boost the tourism industry.

Many opportunities for economic development are also made possible thanks to the solid financial contribution of funding organizations such as Human Resources and Skills Development Canada as well as Western Economic Diversification Canada.

3.4.5. Participation in events for the general public

A partnership between four provincial Francophone associations (Kelowna, Prince George, Terrace and Victoria) helped locate regional Anglophone fairs taking place in their respective areas. These associations then participated in these fairs as exhibitors and got together with their members and partners under the banner "Bonjour." This initiative enabled them to make themselves known to approximately 20,000 visitors (Anglophones, Francophones and Francophiles) and created opportunities for some of these visitors to access French-language programs and services.

3.4.6. Promotion of Francophone tourism

The creation of Francophone spaces sporting the "Bonjour" logo in tourism information centres led to partnerships between Tourism British Columbia, the Visitor Centres of Campbell River, Kamloops, Kitimat, Penticton and Terrace, the chambers of commerce of these five municipalities, the Association des francophones de Campbell River, the Association des francophones de Kamloops, the Association des francophones et francophiles du Nord-Ouest, the French employment services centres of Kelowna and Penticton, as well as the Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique. Frequent information meetings and exchanges of best practices between the tourism and municipal authorities and the regional Francophone associations raised awareness of Francophone communities or gave them greater visibility, and encouraged Visitor Centres to recruit bilingual staff and Francophone tourists to request services in French.

3.5. Francophone culture and gatherings

3.5.1. Centre culturel francophone de Vancouver

For over 35 years, the Centre culturel francophone de Vancouver has played an essential role in the promotion of Francophone culture and artists. Every year, the Centre offers the population of the Metropolitan Vancouver many shows and exhibitions involving Francophone and Francophile artists. People interested in French language and culture can also take advantage of several educational programs and services offered in French by the Centre.

Every year in June, the Centre organizes, in cooperation with many partners, the Festival d'été francophone de Vancouver, one of the most important cultural events in Western Canada. This open-air festival allows the region's Francophones and Francophiles to attend musical performances, which reflect the very essence of international Francophone diversity.Footnote 27

3.5.2. Société francophone de Maillardville

In 2008, the Société francophone de Maillardville received the Prix Boréal, an award presented by the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada, to highlight its work and dedication in building a Francophone environment and to honour the 100th anniversary of the community of Maillardville.

For the celebrations surrounding this event, the Francophone community put a lot of effort in revitalizing the village. To make this a reality, the community enjoyed the support of many partners, such as the municipal, provincial and federal governments, private businesses and cultural organizations. Over the past year, the work of all these partners facilitated the development of a business plan and a study by Industry Canada on attracting businesses. Furthermore, the community received funds to beautify the village and create Francophone-themed façades.

In the context of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, these efforts would also allow the community to offer visitors from all over the world a very unique French-Canadian experience, in addition to the positive impact this would have on the Francophonie and the province.Footnote 28

3.5.3. Festival du Bois

For over 20 years now, the Société francophone de Maillardville has organized the annual Festival du Bois, the most important Francophone festival in Western Canada. In 2008, for instance, the Festival attracted over 17,000 visitors and was recognized by Business in Vancouver magazine as one of Vancouver's biggest cultural events. By discovering the history of the Francophones of Maillardville, its dance and music performances or a sampling of traditional dishes, this unique festival provides entertainment and allows visitors to learn more about the Francophone culture of this community of the Metropolitan Vancouver.Footnote 29

3.5.4. Maple Sugar Festival of Nanaimo

Every year, the Association des francophones de Nanaimo holds the Maple Sugar Festival. For three days, this unique bilingual event presents a series of activities allowing the general public to experience a myriad of French-Canadian festivities, featuring educational and visual exhibitions, music, clowns, traditional dishes and a veritable joie de vivre.

For five years, the Association des francophones de Nanaimo has partnered with Port Theatre, the municipal theatre where most regional cultural events take place. Besides the opening gala of the Maple Sugar Festival, Port Theatre also sponsors a French-language show. This event attracts a new audience while increasing the visibility of the Association des francophones de Nanaimo in the Francophone and Francophile communities. For its part, the Association finances and presents a show in French in the Port Theatre annual program. For the past few years, this partnership has led Port Theatre to translate into French all news releases concerning its program during the Maple Sugar Festival. The Association then distributes these news releases to the media, its members and its Francophone network.Footnote 30

4. Logic models and vitality indicators

This section presents an overview of the expectations and priorities determined by the task force that developed and validated the logic models for each chosen sector: 1) governance, 2) immigration and migration, 3) participation, and 4) belonging (participation and belonging being two aspects of community renewal). This section will describe the following:

  • The logic model for each sector developed by the task force;
  • Indicators for the targeted results;
  • Data sources to be used to evaluate the results.

A logic model illustrates the sequence of expected results and efforts made to create or maintain vitality in a field or community sector.

4.1. Community governance

Francophone stakeholders who participated in the study on community vitality indicators in British Columbia had just finished reviewing the evaluation of the 2004–2009 Global Development Plan of British Columbia's Francophone community and preparing the 2009—2014 Global Development Plan. They therefore had a head start in developing targeted results for governance, main fields of activity in this sector as well as products and services to maintain or develop for provincial, regional and local Francophone organizations as well as their communities.

4.1.1. Fields of activity

The community governance logic model produced and validated by the British Columbia task force consists of three main fields of activity, and each one includes planned products and services.

4.1.1.1. Program and infrastructure planning and management

Program and infrastructure planning and management, for the most part defined in the Global Development Plan, target two simultaneous objectives through a process of consultation, development and approval: firstly, by linking the Plan with the planning and implementation processes of community associations, organizations, groups and institutions; and, secondly, by raising awareness among public decision-makers through joint committees as well as bipartite and multiparty committees and eventually establishing ties with the three levels of government (municipal, provincial and federal).

4.1.1.2. Renewal of human, material and financial resources

The renewal of human, material and financial resources by Francophone community associations is necessary in order to increase community capacity for governance and service delivery and increase representation of Francophone diversity within these associations. This will be made possible with adequate and stable financial support, training and mentoring programs, which will contribute to attracting and retaining permanent staff and strengthening the skills and capacities of organizations in terms of governance and management.

4.1.1.3. Communication and promotion

Communication and promotion are considered by the participants to be key elements of community governance. Thanks to a collective media strategy, a communication plan (including a brand image and effective messaging) and the dissemination of informative content to the community (such as accounts of its history, knowledge and achievements), the Francophone community will be able to more easily reach and inform the Francophonie in all its diversity as well as the general British Columbia population.

In the medium term, coordinated community governance actions will contribute to maintaining the relevance and cohesion of measures taken by community organizations; to obtaining provincial programs adapted to the needs of Francophones; to a community that controls its own resources; to a community governance that reflects the evolving Francophone population; and internal and external recognition of Francophones' strengths and contributions.

In the long term, living in French will be a legitimate choice anywhere in British Columbia.

Logic model: Community governance sector
Logic model of the Community governance sector. Description follows.
Description – Logic model: Community governance sector
Table 2: Indicators and data sources – Community governance sector
Expected Results Indicators Data Sources
1. Increased shared understanding of community objectives a) Approval of the Global Development Plan at the annual general meeting of the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique a) Annual general meeting minutes
b) Number and type of partners to whom the Global Development Plan was presented b) Ibid.
2. Awareness and commitment of public servants and public decision-makers a) Number of meetings with public decision-makers a) Organizations' annual activity reports
b) Number and type of follow-ups and feedback from decision-makers to the community (e.g. participation in community activities.) b) Ibid.
c) Number of agreements signed with government institutions c) Financial reports
d) Amount of programming and projects funded by government institutions d) Ibid.
3. Capacity for governance, management and service delivery by community organizations a) Sufficient and adequate human and financial resources (e.g. percentage of permanent employees) a) Financial reports
b) Number of sessions and participants in training offered to boards of directors and staff b) Annual reports
c) Average number of years of seniority of employees c) Organizations' counts
d) Ratio of permanent employees to temporary staff (interns, contractors) d) Ibid.
e) Number of filled or vacant volunteer positions (e.g. with the board of directors or during a particular event) e) Internal activity reports
f) Number of new memberships with organizations f) Annual reports
g) Quality of infrastructures (e.g. physical facilities where services are offered, gymnasiums, rooms for intercultural, intergenerational or community meetings) g) Field study
4. Increased mobilization and representation of Francophone diversity a) Number of organizations composed of members from different target communities a) Annual reports
b) Longevity of services in Francophone organizations offered to members from various cultural communities b) Organizations' counts
c) Converging views among leaders of various interest groups and various target communities c) Survey
5. Increased presence in the public sphere and media by the Francophone community a) Number of articles in Anglophone and Francophone media on the Francophone community a) Media analysis (e.g. news articles)
b) Number of spokespersons' interventions in the media b) Ibid.
c) Participation of representatives in local, provincial or national collaborations (information exchange) and decision-making networks (bipartite committees) c) Activity reports
d) Ratio between opportunities considered (or for which invitations were received) and those taken (effective participation) d) Francophone organizations' activity reports and studies
e) Associations' Internet presence (e.g. Facebook, MySpace) e) Inventories
f) Number of visitors to Francophone organization Web sites f) Web sites statistics
6. Increased knowledge of the Francophone community by the general British Columbia population a) Population's participation and satisfaction rate regarding community activities and events (e.g. festivals, shows) a) Surveys or activity reports
b) Presence of Francophone organizations or Francophones in Anglophone media b) Media analysis
c) Number and type of partnerships with British Columbia institutions and organizations c) Activity reports
7. Continuing relevance and consistency of measures taken by community organizations a) Level of linkages between the Global Development Plan (2009-2014) and organizational planning (ideas are retained and implemented at the local level) a) Review of the Global Development Plan (2009-2014) and organizations' funding requests
b) Clientele's use of and satisfaction with services provided b) Surveys or program evaluations
c) Number of community organizations that systematically collect data c) Surveys, studies, program evaluations
d) Level of participation in community coordination mechanisms (e.g. vacant positions) d) Activity reports and annual reports
e) Ratio between financial resources for operations and funding allocated to community development programs and services e) Organizations' financial statements
8. Government programs adapted to the needs of Francophones a) Number of government programs with a French-language component a) Reports by federal departments and Simon Fraser University's Office of Francophone and Francophile Affairs
b) Ratio between funding requested and funding received b) Internal documents from Francophone community organizations
c) Number of official community consultations by government authorities c) Reports from government agencies and community organizations
9. Control of resources by the Francophone community a) Number of functional community spaces (e.g. centres, theatres, daycares) a) Counts
b) Self-generated income b) Activity reports; financial statements
c) Number or percentage of organizations that have management tools in place (e.g. administrative cycle, human resources policies, employee manual, agreements, standardized policies) c) Activity reports; studies on Francophone community organizations
10. Community governance that reflects the evolving Francophone population a) Number of vacant positions on boards of directors or committees a) Annual reports
b) Representation rate of the Francophone population on boards of directors b) Ibid.
c) Number, relevance of and participation in staff training opportunities c) Organizations' annual reports
11. Internal and external recognition of Francophones' strengths and contributions a) Number of galas held for and number of distinctions and awards bestowed upon members of the Francophone community by their organizations a) Activity reports and news releases
b) Number of galas held for and number of distinctions and awards received by Francophones or their organizations by other organizations b) News releases and correspondence
c) Number of references to events, sites and presentations (real and virtual) related to the historical heritage of the Francophone presence in British Columbia c) Archives (documentation on various media supports), publications, articles, exhibitions, testimonies, works in various fields
d) Number of references to events, sites and presentations (real and virtual) related to modern and contemporary creations and initiatives by British Columbia Francophones d) Documentation on various media supports, publications, articles, exhibitions, testimonies, works in various fields
12. Living in French is a legitimate choice anywhere in British Columbia a) Ratio between funding requests and support received from public funding organizations a) Organizations' internal documentation; documentation from government departments and agencies
b) Level of response to requests for certain services (e.g. waiting lists; services that are not offered even if they were set out or planned in the programming) b) Comparison of action plans with services provided (by both community and government organizations)
c) Impression of the Francophone community's vitality c) Survey

4.2. Immigration and migration

The immigration and migration sector was identified as a priority for which the community believes it is necessary to mobilize the efforts required in order to extend the scope and reach of services, ensure their interaction between community and public stakeholders, actively promote services to newcomers,Footnote 31 and raise community awareness through programs that recognize and promote the Francophonie and cultural diversity.

4.2.1. Fields of activity

The immigration and migration logic model includes five fields of activity in which the task force believes measures must be coordinated to achieve the targeted results.

4.2.1.1. Service development

Development of services for newcomers has already begun. Some services were part of a multiparty agreement between Francophone community and government organizations (see best practices). For the Francophone community, it is important to extend the range of intake, orientation and support services provided to newcomers in order to ensure the delivery of these services in all regions in which newcomers are located, and thereby increase the intake and support capacity of Francophone organizations. Achieving these results could be made possible by implementing one-stop services and coordination mechanisms for community, federal and provincial services.

4.2.1.2. Coordination among service organizations

It is essential that service organizations work together and coordinate community and public services offered to newcomers. This coordination is vital in order to maximize resources and service efficiency.

4.2.1.3. Training

Training for newcomers includes a whole range of activities (language training, employment training, recognition of knowledge and equivalences, training for entry into college and university, etc.) requiring better coordination that will facilitate the transition between the various services, training and employment programs, and the labour market. According to the task force, a mechanism coordinating the various training programs provided will promote better retention of these people.

4.2.1.4. Promotion

The promotion of all services provided to newcomers requires adequate promotional tools and the use of Anglophone and Francophone media, which will enable the community to transmit pertinent and useful information to the Francophone immigrant and migrant target groups.

4.2.1.5. Awareness

It is necessary to raise awareness in the host community. Regardless of what services are offered to newcomers, raising awareness in the Francophone community itself is important. This community should recognize Francophone cultural diversity through mutually beneficial experiences. This could be done by implementing a program of recognition and promotion of cultural diversity within the British Columbia Francophone community, which would increase the level of knowledge about cultural diversity and the number of cross-cultural opportunities.

In the medium term, the implementation, maintenance and development of these coordinated approaches will enable the British Columbia Francophone community and its partners to improve their welcome, orientation and retention capacity with respect to Francophone newcomers. For their part, newcomers will be better integrated at the economic, social and cultural levels in the British Columbia Francophone milieu.

It is anticipated that all of these coordinated measures will benefit in a vibrant, inclusive, diverse and integrated Francophone community.

Logic model: Immigration and migration sector
Logic model of the Immigration and migration sector. Description follows.
Description – Logic model: Immigration and migration sector
Table 3: Indicators and data sources – Immigration and migration sector
Expected Results Indicators Data Sources
1. Increased welcome, orientation and support capacities with respect to Francophone newcomers a) Number of community and public organizations offering French-language services to newcomers a) Inventory of departments, government agencies and community organizations (e.g. Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Services (AMSSA) and Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development (ALMD))
b) Number and rate of use of orientation and support services for newcomers (immigrants and migrants) b) Organizations' internal statistics
c) Range of intake services offered to Francophone newcomers c) Service organizations' activity reports
2. Improved resources and services offered to Francophone newcomers a) Number of French-language services offered to newcomers a) Service organizations' activity reports
b) Satisfaction rate for users of those services b) Satisfaction survey for newcomers
3. Increased capacity for the retention of Francophone newcomers a) Number and placement rate for employment service users a) Organizations offering employment services to newcomers
b) Number of development or expertise transfer programs and services according to Canadian and provincial standards b) AMSSA, ALMD
c) Rate of representation of newcomers (staff, volunteers and members elected to boards of directors) in Francophone organizations c) Annual Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique questionnaire sent to Francophone organizations
d) Average length of stay of Francophone newcomers (immigrants and migrants) d) Data from newcomer support organizations
4. Pertinent and useful information obtained by Francophone newcomers a) Number of directories distributed in the province or consulted on-line a) Data from the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique
b) Number of visitors and pages consulted at Vivre en Colombie-Britannique.ca b) Data from Vivre en Colombie-Britannique.ca
c) Number of newcomers participating in French-language public events c) Data from Francophone organizations or event promoters
d) Number of interventions or information sessions where newcomers are introduced to the Francophone community d) Data from (Francophone and Anglophone) community and provincial organizations
5. Greater knowledge about and increased number of opportunities for cross-cultural experience and recognition of cultural diversity a) Number of ongoing and one-time activities recognizing cultural diversity a) Francophone organizations' program data
b) Number of French-language programs with an intercultural dimension b) Francophone and Francophile organizations' programming data
c) Number of shows and news reports promoting cultural diversity c) Data from Francophone organizations and media
6. Welcome, orientation and retention capacities with regard to Francophone newcomers, improved by the British Columbia Francophone community and its partners a) Presence and number of structured partnerships to improve and provide intake, orientation and retention services to Francophone newcomers a) Government and community organizations' activity reports
b) Amounts granted to organizations offering intake, orientation and retention services to Francophone newcomers b) Organizations' annual activity reports and financial reports
c) Number of human resources dedicated to intake, orientation and retention activities for Francophone newcomers c) Francophone organizations' annual reports
7. Better integration of newcomers at the economic, social and cultural levels in the British Columbia Francophone milieu a) Average time required by newcomers to find a job or start up a business a) Francophone organizations providing intake services to newcomers
b) Unemployment rate for the Francophone newcomer population b) Organizations offering employment services to newcomers
c) Participation rate of newcomers in Francophone cultural events c) Data from Francophone organizations
8. A vibrant, inclusive, diverse and integrated Francophone community a) Growth rate of Francophone population a) Data from Statistics Canada
b) Participation rate of newcomers in the various components of the Francophone community (members, members elected to boards of directors, staff, volunteers) b) Data from Francophone organizations
c) Participation rate of newcomers (in particular, young Francophone immigrants and migrants) who constitute Francophone renewal c) Ibid.

4.3. Participation

Among the factors contributing to the renewal of the British Columbia Francophone community, participation and community belonging have been proposed in the framework of this study. Components of this participation—the importance of which is so often highlighted even though the dynamics are not clearly articulated—were explicitly discussed and analyzed by the task force.

4.3.1. Fields of activity

The participation logic model includes four fields of activity that share common community renewal aspects. Community renewal stems from coordinated measures that are conducive to participation.

4.3.1.1. Organizational continuity and renewal

Organizational continuity and renewal is underway and is being pursued through coordination initiatives such as the evaluation and development of the Global Development Plan. However, in addition to organizations agreeing on the vision and management of the Plan and the will to ensure the continuity and development of common goods and services, the evolution and transformation of Francophone culture requires renewed and increased governance and management capacities to ensure participation, which is conducive to vitality.

4.3.1.2. Infrastructure continuity and renewal

Infrastructure continuity and renewal could be optimized by using existing institutional and community infrastructures, based on agreements between the parties involved. This approach will contribute to facilitating access to community facilities, increasing the number of activity spaces available to Francophones and Francophiles in the regions, and increasing participation.

4.3.1.3. Leadership renewal

Leadership renewal will be possible thanks to the implementation of a strategy that will help reach and mobilize potential leaders from various walks of life and age groups, particularly youth (whose number is declining), newcomers and young retirees. Their recruitment and individual and collective commitment could have a catalyzing effect on their environments and on the whole community, and could contribute to a leadership that is representative of Francophone cultural diversity.

4.3.1.4. Coordination with British Columbia community and public organizations

Coordination with community and public organizations throughout British Columbia will have an impact on participation by promoting collaborations and concrete partnerships as well as by more generally fostering positive views, appreciation and recognition of the Francophone community. This aspect was also retained and is a priority in the community governance sector.

Through combined efforts, these four fields of activity should, in the medium term, produce community services that are more suitable for a broad sample of the Francophone population; increase participation of Francophones in all fields of activity within community organizations, activities and events in the Francophone milieu; and lead to a favourable evolution of attitudes towards British Columbia's Francophones and Francophonie.

In the longer term, all these efforts will result in a British Columbia Francophone milieu that will grow and develop through the renewed participation of the Francophone community.

Logic model: Community participation sector
Logic model of the Community participation sector. Description follows.
Description – Logic model: Community participation sector
Table 4: Indicators and data sources – Community participation sector
Expected Results Indicators Data Sources
1. Increased Francophone human resources capacities in organizational governance and management a) Degree of achievement of organizations' strategic results a) Evaluation of organizational and institutional efficiency
b) Number of training opportunities in French b) Organizations' reports
c) Average number of volunteer hours put in by Francophones in community organizations c) Summary of volunteer hours put in by employees and leaders, as counted by organizations
d) Proportion of (volunteer and paid) qualified staff occupying positions in organizations d) Skills assessment for a board of directors (Volunteer Canada's model)
2. Increased accessibility and use of community and institutional facilities of the Francophone community a) Number of French-language points of service a) Lists from the Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique
b) Degree of French-language service use b) Reports from organizations and institutions
3. Leadership representing cultural diversity and creating individual and collective commitments in the Francophone milieu a) Representation of cultural diversity in community leadership a) Reports from organizations and institutions on groups targeted and reached
b) Francophones' level of commitment to promoting their community b) Reports on organizations' promotional communication methods and media
c) Number of people participating in meetings and activities c) Reports from organizations on participation in activities and meetings
4. Increased collaboration of British Columbia partners and their appreciation of value added by the Francophone community a) Number of partnerships with British Columbia organizations and institutions a) Active and formal memoranda of understanding
b) Quality of agreements: degree of participation of British Columbia organizations and institutions in offering services to Francophones b) Reports on agreements between British Columbia organizations and institutions and Francophone groups
c) Length of agreements c) Reports on agreements
d) Number of Francophones holding leadership positions (at the municipal and provincial levels, and in sectors including education, economics, etc.) d) Community and government directories
5. Suitable community services for a broad sample of the Francophone population a) Number and participation rate of clients or members from various population groups or categories a) Service organizations' reports
b) Programming in organizations offering a wide range of priority activities to Francophones b) Organizations' annual reports
c) Number of organizations serving newcomers (immigrants and migrants) c) Ibid.
6. Increased Francophone participation in all fields of activity within community organizations, activities and events in the Francophone milieu a) Number of Francophone elected representatives and persons in charge at all levels of community and government organizations a) Organizations' annual reports
b) Number of Francophone entrepreneurs b) Reports from the Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique and from Western Economic Diversification Canada
c) Number of health professionals offering services in French c) Francophone directories
d) Participation rate of Francophones in events organized in the Francophone community d) Reports from organizers
7. Favourable shift in attitudes in British Columbia towards Francophones and the Francophonie a) Number of partnerships with municipal and provincial governments a) Organizations' annual reports
b) Increase in French-language signage initiated as part of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games b) Systematic study of French-language signage and actual services before, during and after the Games
c) Number of government consultations with Francophones c) Frequency and length of consultation processes
d) Number of assemblies and meetings in which the Francophone community is invited to participate (e.g. La Boussole invitation from the Social Council) d) Organizations' annual reports and telephone surveys with organizations' directors general
8. Growth and development of the British Columbia Francophone milieu through the sustained and renewed participation of the Francophone community a) Commitment and retention: number of children enrolled in French-language schools a) Conseil scolaire francophone school statistics
b) Participation rate of Francophones in organizations, institutions, events and services offered in French in British Columbia b) One-time surveys, special surveys and organizations' reports

4.4. Community belonging

The components of community belonging, activities conducive to its emergence and continuity as well as its contribution to the renewal of the British Columbia Francophonie were explored, discussed and analyzed by the task force in order to better understand this phenomenon and encourage Francophone networks to take community belonging into account when taking planned and coordinated measures.

4.4.1. Fields of activity

The community belonging logic model includes five fields of activity in which the community believes it should invest in order to promote a sense of belonging among Francophones.

4.4.1.1. Network of the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique

The network of the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique is considered a leading player suitably qualified to take the necessary measures so that organizations' volunteers and staff, regardless of their level of responsibility, have access to adequate training that promotes increased knowledge transfer and skills renewal. This priority of renewing employees' capacity and skills converges with the focus on similar priorities in every other sector analyzed.

4.4.1.2. Cultural network

The cultural network plays a crucial role in Francophone identification and unity in both the Metropolitan Vancouver, and other regions. The task force hopes that the network program can reach a greater part of the Francophone and Francophile general public and that it contributes to building their loyalty.

4.4.1.3. Education and youth networks

Education and youth networks are looked upon to offer various forms of meetings, training programs, gatherings and mobilization of youth at all levels, from preschool to university, in school, extracurricular and community environments. These elements are considered as the main and essential activities for creating and supporting a Francophone sense of belonging in youth.

4.4.1.4. New service networks

Newly implemented service networks (health services, legal services and support to economic initiatives) established jointly with government agencies could attract and retain new Francophone clients. Most notably, this will help maintain and increase accessibility and use of available services.

4.4.1.5. Communication and promotion

Communication and promotion are considered a priority in the community belonging model in order to better market French-language services and activities to the greatest number of people and to increase recognition of the Francophone community by the various political authorities. To accomplish this, communication and promotion must be supported by adequate media tools, in both Anglophone and Francophone media. As previously mentioned, communication and promotion are key elements of community governance.

In the medium term, coordinated efforts in these fields of activity will increase Francophone organizations' capacities and skills to serve the community; increase participation of a diversified Francophone public (including youth, women, seniors, retirees and newcomers) in activities and services offered by community networks in the Francophone milieu; and increase recognition of the Francophone community in the public sphere and the media.

In the long term, all of these achievements will result in the vitality and continuity of the British Columbia Francophone community, which will be ensured by Francophones' dynamism, quality of life, participation and strong sense of belonging.

Logic model: Community belonging sector
Logic model of the Community belonging sector. Description follows.
Description – Logic model: Community belonging sector
Table 5: Indicators and data sources – Community belonging sector
Expected Results Indicators Data Sources
1. Increased knowledge transfer and skills renewal a) Number of organizations with coaching policies for staff, including volunteers a) Policy, evaluation manual and evaluation of results
b) Number of organizations with a training and evaluation policy b) Organizations' training policy
c) Number, frequency and variety of training sessions offered to staff, including volunteers, and number of participants in these training sessions c) Action plan and evaluation of results
d) Staff satisfaction d) Survey
e) Degree of employees' skills when performing tasks assigned to them e) Managers' evaluation reports, including members of the boards of directors
2. Loyalty of new audiences and expansion of Francophone and Francophile audiences a) Representativeness in the participation of various audience groups based on the target population's composition a) Survey for members of the public and data from organizations and institutions
b) Level of efficiency of targeted promotional campaigns b) Survey of target and non-target audiences
c) Rate of recognition of the British Columbia Francophone brand image c) Evaluation of events
d) Number of tickets sold by Francophone cultural organizations (shows, exhibitions, etc.) and number of members d) Data from organizations
3. Youth awareness of Francophone cultural identity a) Participation of youth in community events a) Data from organizers and promoters
b) Existence and degree of self-identification with the Francophone identity b) Studies (e.g. Conseil scolaire francophone, Canadian Institute for Research on Linguistic Minorities or Statistics Canada)
c) Percentage of youth who self-identify as Francophone c) Ibid.
4. Maintained and increased accessibility and use of services a) Number and proportion of services that have been increased (or maintained) a) Data from community organizations and government service agencies
b) Rate of availability (fairness) and accessibility of services b) Directory of Francophone professionals per location or area
c) Number of service users (adaptation to demand) c) Study of demand; operational plans and reports (health, justice, economics); provincial statistics
5. Improved and increased information and communication within the Francophone population a) Number of pieces of information for Francophones that appeared in various sources of information a) Data from organizations and media statistics
b) Number and variety of media used b) Ibid.
c) Number of community statements and media responses c) Inventory of media statements and responses
d) Number of visitors to community organizations' websites d) Data from Web sites
6. Increased recognition of the Francophone community by political authorities at all levels a) Number of invitations and participants in meetings with the mayor, members of the legislative assembly, ministers, etc. a) Internal and official documentation
b) Average length of participation in joint committees in which community and public organizations participate b) Documentation from committees and correspondence
c) Quality of follow-ups to recommendations and opinions proposed by joint committees in which community and public organizations participate c) Internal documents
7. Increased capacities and skills of Francophone organizations to serve the Francophone and Francophile communities a) Program variety offered to existing and new audiences a) Studies on needs; satisfaction surveys
b) Volunteer recruitment rate b) Documents from boards and committees; organizations' annual reports
c) Volunteer retention rate c) Ibid.
8. Increased ownership by diversified Francophone and Francophile audiences (including youth, women, seniors and retirees, migrants and immigrants) of activities and services that are accessible and offered in French by community, public and private networks a) Rate of participation in activities and use of services (maintenance and growth in terms of length) a) Organizations' reports: observations about volunteer banks and members of boards of directors
b) Francophones' degree of commitment to French-language activities and services b) Surveys of target groups and users
c) Number of participants served c) Statistics on participation in activities and use of community and public services
9. Recognition of the Francophonie in the public sphere and the media a) Number and visibility of public French-language signage (advertising space) in communities (and other promotional supports) a) Surveys; data from community organizations, municipalities and governments
b) Media presence of the Francophone community outside its own network b) Internal data and media networks; correspondence
c) Rate of recognition of the Francophone community “branding” image c) Survey
d) Number of complaints received by the province's federal institutions regarding the application of the Official Languages Act d) Data published by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages
10. The vitality and continuity of the British Columbia Francophone community are ensured by Francophones' dynamism, quality of life, participation and strong sense of belonging a) Level of recognition by Francophones and Francophiles that living in French is a legitimate choice in British Columbia a) Research and surveys regarding the French presence in British Columbia
b) Number of immediate and intermediate outcomes of the logic model that were achieved and that contributed to the final outcome b) Reports of the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique and community organizations
c) Community's observations of changing vitality factors or evolution of Francophone vitality c) Next Global Development Plan and strategic planning of community organizations, groupings and institutions

Conclusion

This study by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has attempted to define the conditions and methods for community renewal and for the development of the British Columbia Francophone community with the contribution and participation of provincial and regional community stakeholders.

The study was carried out after the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique (FFCB) consulted community organizations and established its five-year Global Development Plan. The next step should be to link the Plan to the programs and priorities of the various levels of government. The stakeholders who participated in the work of the FFCB and later in this study had therefore already reflected on and discussed their action priorities concerning the British Columbia Francophone community.

Consequently, the study served, on the one hand, to delve further into the governance and immigration sectors and, on the other hand, to specify expected results and required activities for community renewal considered from the dual perspective of participation and belonging. These dimensions, although generally recognized as intrinsic components of community vitality continuity and renewal, are nevertheless included in community action planning and management rather than owned and managed by specific organizations or Francophone networks. The meetings therefore allowed these dimensions to be addressed in an exploratory manner and made it possible to envision the necessary links between British Columbia organizations and Francophone institutions and community organizations, in order to optimize community development.

The conceptual framework of the study also allowed existing activity elements and projects to be collected and organized in a systematic and consistent manner. The stakeholders based their reflections on the results-based management approach. This approach proved to be relevant in giving direction to the experience of belonging and calls for participation, to the benefit of community governance and the integration of Francophone newcomers, within a coordinated approach to create and maintain the vitality of a British Columbia Francophone milieu.

Finally, the study also identified quantitative and qualitative performance indicators for the targeted results. The Francophone community can thus access basic tools to evaluate its vitality according to expected results for the aspects that were studied. The community will therefore be able to use these tools in the accountability exercises required by its members and partners. This study sheds light on the fact that this process will require rigorous planning and monitoring in all its phases. However, British Columbia Francophone community organizations will need support to strengthen their evaluation capacities, with regard to both human resources as well as financial and technical resources.

It is important that governments recognize the pivotal work of organizations, institutions, groups and networks with regard to vitality. They are the actors and leaders that create, maintain and renew Francophone milieux within British Columbia. It is crucial that they combine their planning, implementation and results-evaluation efforts in order to collaboratively ensure the vitality, continuity and viability of British Columbia's Francophone community.

Appendix A - Bibliography and documents consulted

Corbeil, Jean-Pierre, Claude Grenier and Sylvie Lafrenière. Survey on the Vitality of the Official-Language Minorities, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, 2006, 172 p.

Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique (FFCB). Annuaire, la Colombie-Britannique à votre service en français, FFCB, Vancouver, 2008, on-line version (French only) consulted June 30, 2009.

Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique (FFCB). Historique de la communauté francophone en Colombie-Britannique et de son organisme porte-parole, FFCB, Vancouver, 2007, on-line version (French only) consulted on June 30, 2009.

Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada (FCFA). Profil des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique, FCFA, Ottawa, 2004, on-line version (French only) consulted June 30, 2009.

Johnson, Marc L. and Paule Doucet. A Sharper View: Evaluating the Vitality of Official Language Minority Communities, Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, Ottawa, 2006, on-line version consulted June 30, 2009.

Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité. Socio-economic profiles : Ottawa, RDÉE, 2005 (British Columbia, Kelowna Regions, Nelson, Greater Vancouver and Victoria), on-line version consulted June 30, 2009.

Statistics Canada. 2006 Community Profiles, Statistics Canada catalogue no. 92-591-XWE, on-line version consulted August 20, 2009.

Appendix B - List of task force members

Danielle Arcand, Associate Director, Office of Francophone and Francophile Affairs, Simon Fraser University

Sophie Aubugeau, Coordinator, Agence francophone pour l'accueil des immigrants

Nathan Caldwell, Director, Centre culturel français de l'Okanagan

Anick Charbonneau, Executive Director, Conseil jeunesse francophone de la Colombie-Britannique

Linda Cosentino, Executive Director, Club Bon Accueil, Powell River

Donald Cyr, Executive Director, Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique

Séverine De Backer, Acting Director, RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique

Diane Dessureault, Executive Director, Association des francophones et francophiles du Nord-Ouest

Michel Dubreuil, Economic Sector Representative, Provincial Coordination Committee 2008–2009

Yseult Friolet, Coordinator, Interdepartmental Coordination, Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique

Louis Giguère, Executive Director, RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique

Yves Hébert, Executive Director, Francophone Society of Victoria

France-Emmanuelle Joly, Executive Director, Réseau-Femmes Colombie-Britannique

Alain Laberge, Director, Conseil scolaire francophone de la Colombie-Britannique

Nicole Langlois, Executive and Artistic Director, Association des francophones de Nanaimo

Tanniar Leba, Executive Director, la Boussole

Carole Morin, Executive Director, Société Inform'Elles

Jamal Nawri, Consultant, Immigration

Jean-François Packwood, Acting Executive Director, Conseil culturel et artistique francophone de la Colombie-Britannique

Pierre Rivard, Executive Director, Centre culturel francophone de Vancouver

Robert Rothon, Executive Director, Canadian Parents for French

Christine Sotteau, Coordinator, Government Relations and Research, Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique

Claire Trépanier, Acting Director, Office of Francophone and Francophile Affairs, Simon Fraser University

Renée Trépanier, Executive Director, Le Cercle des Canadiens-français de Prince George

Yves Trudel, Executive Director, Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique

Representatives of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

Martine Boucher, Policy Analyst, Ottawa

Karsten Kaemling, Liaison Officer, Vancouver

Ricky G. Richard, Team Leader, Policy Analyst, Ottawa

The members of the task force participated as individuals and the views expressed do not necessarily represent those of their employers or host organizations.

Paule Doucet, an associate with Consortia Development Group, was a facilitator for the task force. She was assisted by Agathe Gaulin, also an associate with this firm.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique, Historique de la communauté francophone en Colombie-Britannique et de son organisme porte-parole, Vancouver, 2007, on-line version consulted June 30, 2009.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

For the past few years, there has been a growing interest in research on definitions of the Francophone population that reflect the diversity and complexity of Canadian Francophonie. Efforts in this area have been undertaken as much at the university level as at the federal and provincial levels. For example, the Government of Ontario recently introduced a new definition of the province's Francophone population. This new definition includes those whose mother tongue is neither French nor English, but who know French and speak it at home. Further information can be found on the Office of Francophone Affairs Web site.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

First official language spoken is derived from three variables: knowledge of the two official languages, mother tongue and language spoken at home. Further information is available on the Statistics Canada Web site.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 97-555-XCB2006028.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 97F0007XCB01043.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 94-581-XCB2006011.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Ibid.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 97-555-XCB2006028.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 97-555-XCB2006015.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Statistics Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (table), 2006 Community Profiles, 2006 Census, Statistics Canada catalogue no. 92-591-XWF, Ottawa, 2007, on-line version consulted November 13, 2009.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Statistics Canada, Table 17: English–French bilingualism among Anglophones and allophones, (single mother tongue), Canada, provinces, territories and Canada less Quebec, 1996 to 2006, on-line version consulted November 13, 2009.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 997-555-XCB2006031.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

However, if Francophones of the official language minority, i.e. half of the people that have French and English as first official languages, are taken into account, the proportion of youth under the age of 20 increases to 13% and the percentage of seniors goes down to 17.3%, while the cohorts of young adults and middle-age adults remain in the same approximate proportions.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 97-555-XCB2006054.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Statistics Canada, 1996, 2001 and 2006 Censuses, Table 8: Net interprovincial migration of Francophone population, provinces and territories, 1991 to 1996, 1996 to 2001 and 2001 to 2006, on-line version consulted June 30, 2009.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, catalogue No. 97-555-XCB2006054.

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

A detailed socio-economic profile of Francophones in Kelowna, Nelson, Greater Vancouver and Victoria (based on 2001 census data) is available on-line on the Réseau de developpement économique et d'employabilité website.

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

Provincial and local associations, i.e. the not-for-profit British Columbia Francophone organizations, as well as para-public institutions and private businesses offering services in French are listed in the 2009-2010 edition of the Annuaire, la Colombie-Britannique à votre service en français, which can be consulted on the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique website.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

The Fédération des francophones de la Colombie-Britannique has 28 active members and a dozen supporting members (2009), most of which are listed in the sections Provincial and sectoral associations and Regional associations.

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

For further information, visit the Web site of the Agence francophone pour l'accueil des immigrants.

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

Canadian Parents for French, Bilingualism Rocks, British Columbia, 2008, on-line version consulted July 20, 2009.

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique is one of the 17 members of the Société Santé en français, a national organization devoted to promoting health services in French in minority Francophone communities.

Return to footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

Information taken from the RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique Web site, on-line version consulted July 17, 2009.

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Simon Fraser University, "OFFA's Mandate," Office of Francophone and Francophile Affairs, on-line version consulted July 17, 2009.

Return to footnote 24 referrer

Footnote 25

Information taken from the Conseil scolaire francophone Web site, on-line version consulted July 10, 2009.

Return to footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

For further information on the Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique, please visit its Web site.

Return to footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

Information taken from the Centre culturel francophone de Vancouver Web site, on-line version consulted July 10, 2009.

Return to footnote 27 referrer

Footnote 28

Information taken from the Société francophone de Maillardville Web site, on-line version consulted July 10, 2009.

Return to footnote 28 referrer

Footnote 29

Information taken from the Festival du Bois Web site, on-line version consulted July 10, 2009.

Return to footnote 29 referrer

Footnote 30

Further information on the Maple Sugar Festival can be found on the Web site.

Return to footnote 30 referrer

Footnote 31

The task force chose to use the term "newcomers" rather than "immigrants" and "migrants."

Return to footnote 31 referrer